LCN academic elected Fellow of the APS

The American Physical Society (APS) 2016 class of fellows has been elected and recently announced.  

Professor Angelos Michaelides has been elected Fellow of the American Physical Society by the APS Council of Representatives at its September meeting, upon the recommendation of the Division of Computational Physics, for his ''fundamental contributions to computational simulations of solids and surfaces, particularly adsorption problems, most notably water-solid interfaces.”  

The number of APS Fellows elected each year is limited to no more than one half of one percent of the membership. APS Fellowships are awarded after extensive review by the Fellowship committee of the appropriate APS division, topical group or forum and by the APS Fellowship Committee.  The membership of APS is diverse and global, and the Fellows of the APS reflect that diversity.

This award is a prestigious recognition of Professor Michaelides' peers of his outstanding contributions to physics.  

Angelos' research aims at understanding important phenomena in surface-materials and nano-science. Using concepts from quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, his group applies and develops methods and computer simulations to study processes of relevance to catalysism - such as the properties of metal surfaces and chemical reactions at surfaces - and processes of environmental relevance - such as the nucleation of ice or the dissolution of salts. Water and ice are major focuses of his work.  

Amongst other things, his group is currently researching a fundamental, molecular-level description of water at interfaces and how ice forms, which will have broad implications from an improved understanding of the climate to better tasting ice cream.  More information surrounding Angelos' research and his recent publications can be found on the ICE group website.  

Angelos is also director of the Thomas Young Centre - London Centre for the Theory and Simulation of Materials.  The Thomas Young Centre (TYC) is a dynamic and interdisciplinary alliance of London researchers which operates at the forefront of science to address the challenges of society and industry through the theory and simulation of materials, or materials modelling.  

Related links: APS Physics; UCL Mathematical and Physical Sciences